sound and light

w. 26 notes

courier5:

Detail from “Metamorphose II”, Maurits Cornelis Escher (1898 - 1972) Woodcut in three colors, 19 × 389.5 cm

courier5 w. 4,626 notes

courier5:

Detail from “Metamorphose II”, Maurits Cornelis Escher (1898 - 1972)
Woodcut in three colors, 19 × 389.5 cm

fossilporn:

Fossil skeleton of Archelon, a giant Cretaceous turtle.  Found in the Pierre Shale of South Dakota.

Wikipedia w. 1,218 notes

fossilporn:

Fossil skeleton of Archelon, a giant Cretaceous turtle.  Found in the Pierre Shale of South Dakota.

newyorker:

Gary Greenberg explores the complexities behind the fragile concept of brain death: http://nyr.kr/1d7s5vx

“Our sense that a body is not dead until it is still and cold may be uninformed and unscientific, but so is our sense that the sun moves across the sky from east to west, and most of us live our lives as if this were the case. Of course, you can’t plan a rocket trip to the moon based on that understanding of heavenly movement, and you can’t harvest organs from a body based on our instinctual understanding of death. The concept of brain death has its uses; organ transplants save many lives. But it has its limits, too.”

Photograph by Zephyr/Getty.

newyorker.com w. 593 notes

newyorker:

Gary Greenberg explores the complexities behind the fragile concept of brain death: http://nyr.kr/1d7s5vx

“Our sense that a body is not dead until it is still and cold may be uninformed and unscientific, but so is our sense that the sun moves across the sky from east to west, and most of us live our lives as if this were the case. Of course, you can’t plan a rocket trip to the moon based on that understanding of heavenly movement, and you can’t harvest organs from a body based on our instinctual understanding of death. The concept of brain death has its uses; organ transplants save many lives. But it has its limits, too.”

Photograph by Zephyr/Getty.

hangme-up-to-dry w. 10,212 notes

gallica.bnf.fr w. 2,064 notes

humanoidhistory:

Happy birthday to German scientist Petrus Apianus, aka Peter Apian, born in Saxony on April 16, 1495. A mathematician, astronomer, and cartographer, he was a favorite of Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire. In 1540, Apian created Astronomicum Caesareum and dedicated it to his imperial benefactor. It was a sumptuous Renaissance instructive manual that explained, in part, how to use an astrolabe to calculate the altitude of the stars and planets. (Bibliotheque Nationale de France)

corporisfabrica:

Bones of the spine, ribs and pelvis
From Anatomia per uso et intelligenza del disegno ricercata non solo su gl’ossi, e muscoli del corpo humano by Bernardino Genga

corporisfabrica w. 417 notes

corporisfabrica:

Bones of the spine, ribs and pelvis

From Anatomia per uso et intelligenza del disegno ricercata non solo su gl’ossi, e muscoli del corpo humano by Bernardino Genga

Flickr / biodivlibrary w. 2,583 notes

uromancy:

Arturo Arias. Skeletal. 2011.

darkthur.deviantart.com w. 2,559 notes

uromancy:

Arturo Arias. Skeletal. 2011.

premierepage:

Images d’Epinal : papillons, oiseaux, animaux, jeu, vie quotidienne, contes, paysages, Metz
Auteur : Wenzel, F. C.. Graveur

gallica.bnf.fr w. 1,252 notes

premierepage:

Images d’Epinal : papillons, oiseaux, animaux, jeu, vie quotidienne, contes, paysages, Metz

Auteur : Wenzel, F. C.. Graveur